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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ortho gave me an old Peetz wooden mooching reel. I have seen others, but can't remember the brand names.

Question----has anyone ever used one?

I took it apart, and the drag is in good shape, as the mechanical parts all move well and are properly lubed.
I'd love to have one working while I use more conventional gear, and I'm really intrigued by the thought of playing a fish on one.

Only possible problem is that the two handles are really wide, and look they might interfere a little with using your palm to help brake the fish.

Either way, it's going on a boat with me this season, and I'll get pics and video.
 

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Many years ago, Sewells in Horseshoe Bay would rent clinker boats with single cylinder, direct drive I think, engines. They also rented Rods with Peetz reels. I have one as well, picked at a garage sale, still unused. So nice to look at. A piece of history.
 

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I grew up in Victoria where Peetz reels and rods were made. They made 4-5-6 and 7 inch reels. They also made extended handles to reel the line in faster. I have two 6 inch Peetz wooden reels and two Peetz rods with the carved wooden handles that were my dad's. They used to make a 7 inch recorder for telling the depth of line you had out. We used wire line and lead weights up to 3 lbs to get down deep in the winter chinook fishing in Saanich Inlet. The reels are very functional. The rods I have are fixed with roller guides for the wire line. One rod is one piece and the other two piece. The reels don't have the smoothest drag system but they work. The handles are wide apart but really not an issue. Keep the gear mechanism well lubed and cleaned on a regular basis. Peetz also makes a metal reel that is used on Vancouver Island.
There were also some English wooden reels made by other companies for salt water fishing that were very heavy and laden with a lot of brass. Quite often they used brass plating on the spool base so that the wire or cord line wouldn't cut into the wooden reel spool.
If you are going to fish your reel I would put good backing on first then put our mono line on it because mono will stretch and create a pressure on the reel and over time can crack it. Enjoy and land the big one of a life time.
 

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Mike, remember my little mailing gaff earlier this year? Sent you the wrong package - I was sending you plugs but instead sent you two Peetz which were destined for their shop in Victoria for re-conditioning.

I love them. I don't use them on the 'rigger much, but still love to row with bait from my little car-topper in Howe Sound once or twice a year.

Incidentally, that is a very good service Peetz provides. The reels came back looking like new, with a nice smooth drag. One is from the '60s or '70s, I believe, as it still has the wooden handles. There is a lot of nostalgia in fishing for me, and I love mooching with a Peetz. It's no Abel, but when you have a fish on, everyone on the grounds knows it!
 

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I grew up in Victoria where Peetz reels and rods were made. They made 4-5-6 and 7 inch reels. They also made extended handles to reel the line in faster. I have two 6 inch Peetz wooden reels and two Peetz rods with the carved wooden handles that were my dad's. They used to make a 7 inch recorder for telling the depth of line you had out. We used wire line and lead weights up to 3 lbs to get down deep in the winter chinook fishing in Saanich Inlet. The reels are very functional. The rods I have are fixed with roller guides for the wire line. One rod is one piece and the other two piece. The reels don't have the smoothest drag system but they work. The handles are wide apart but really not an issue. Keep the gear mechanism well lubed and cleaned on a regular basis. Peetz also makes a metal reel that is used on Vancouver Island.
There were also some English wooden reels made by other companies for salt water fishing that were very heavy and laden with a lot of brass. Quite often they used brass plating on the spool base so that the wire or cord line wouldn't cut into the wooden reel spool.
If you are going to fish your reel I would put good backing on first then put our mono line on it because mono will stretch and create a pressure on the reel and over time can crack it. Enjoy and land the big one of a life time.
I have never fished a Peetz reel, but used to fish the "Scarborough reels" from the UK.

They were excellent "bottom fishing" reels - for grouper and snapper. Later, we used to wrap a carpet strip (1" sewn together to form a tight loop) around the brass arm (that the wooden reel was attached too) - and wedge it so that the reel would not turn, we then trolled it with (squid or cut bait) to catch sail fish and wahoo - talk about knuckle busters and burned palms (no drag on those puppies)

Those were the days of growing up on the Zulu land coast and fishing the Indian Ocean.
 

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I also have a Peetz reel. From the late 50s. On a short trolling rod of the same vintage. Rod says made in Kamloops on it and both rod and reel still get used every couple of years.
 

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Fished one out at the hump earlier this year , drag was fairly catchy ie. On or off. Dont wast to much time gettin to it when it comes off the rigger clip though to loosen drag or snap there goes a fish.
Lots of fun playing a fish though...
 

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I still fish with a 6" Peetz on one rod and am always looking for a deal to add some more to the collection. They are a great reel and are a blast to play a fish on. I don't an Islander so I'm no qualified expert but the Peetz is hands down my fav reel.
 

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I have a few i keep on hand
The big guy is a recorder
These ones arent pretty but they are all original except for pristine english starback reel Its just pretty😀


Sent from my rotary phone using tapacrap!

 

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I have tried these but they are best left as a decoration in the house they just dont compare to a big level wind with spiderline. The drag is funnny and I have lost a couple fish. If you are a history buff into using period equipment sure... but they really arent quite as good as the new stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I have tried these but they are best left as a decoration in the house they just dont compare to a big level wind with spiderline. The drag is funnny and I have lost a couple fish. If you are a history buff into using period equipment sure... but they really arent quite as good as the new stuff.
I believe they were intended for mooching, and not really comparable to a level wind-
More the predecessor of the 4" moochers of today.

Do you troll with a level wind?
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
That's a rather sturdy set-up. 60 lb. wow-
You could land almost anything in the water with that.

I don't care for level wind-- won't use it unless I absolutely need it--hali and other bottom fish.
I much prefer to essentially hand-battle the salmon.
You see them more in Alaska...I have fished salmon in BC for many years and can't remember seeing
anyone not using a mooching reel for that. After my first fish on one, I was a convert.
(A convert with some bashed knuckles that hurt for a week)

Rods vary--Shimano Convergence is a good one, and you'll find LOTS of great rods,
but they will be 10-1/2' long, very flexible mooching rods.
Man---do they wear out a slab-

Reel--I own both the Islander MR3 and the Abel Moocher--I give the edge to the Abel.
Thanks to forum member BCI for singing their praises...he fishes as much as anyone I know.

Line-25 lb Maxima Ultragreen is ideal.
 

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Level winds are virtually idiot proof (not that someone using one is) but a mooching reel adds so much more than just reeling and adjusting drag.
Old school stuff is cool.
Whatever your take or thrill when fishing, enjoy it, then search out the next CHALLENGE. :2cents:
 

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I've used really old-school Peetz reels before in the early days...

Other than their historic vintage collectible value , they're not even worth using compared to the reels of today.

The drag system on those relic Peetz's is virtually useless.

And the noise they make from the ratchet when you have a fish on is a seal dinner-bell.

Nice to look at , but I'd never use one of the old ones nowadays unless there was nothing else available.


I read that they are now coming out with a new version of the Peetz that has a totally modern drag system on it.......
 

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Yea, I suppose I fish mostly to feed my family rather than for the sport. I also dont generally release. For example I do not throw back a chum or a pink in hopes of getting a coho or spring. To each their own! Can definitely appreciate the sport of it though!
 

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Grew up using nothing but peets, I wouldn't say they have a "Drag System" its really just a brass nut to keep the line from spaying out while trolling. As soon as you get a bite you need to loosent the wing nut, even before setting the hook. Compared to the new stuff you really need to be a good angler to land fish on a peetz, and you need to be on the ball if the fish trips the downrigger clip you need to give it slack because it will not take much to break a leader.
 

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Full disclosure: I just picked up a 1977 Peetz reel.

On the westcoast for Salmon trolling, nearly 100% of anglers are running modern mooching reels. Reels with essentially 1:1 pickup. That's a huge disadvantage compared to something with 5:1. Isn't it interesting that the absolute westcoast default is a mooching reel?

Funny where the line gets drawn in terms of being 'sporting' or 'giving the fish a chance'.

I bought a 1977 Peetz (with it's nasty knuckle-busting 1 way drag, and an 8' Peetz rod) for the same reason most folks fish a modern moocher: I want a challenge. Sure, I'll probably put it away after the novelty wears from landing (and losing) some big fish this year, but we're all out to challenge ourselves on some level.

Tight Lines
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
If you want meat in the box, go heavy line on a level wind--on a scale of 1 to 10 on 'sporting', that gets a Minus something.
If you want to feel every head shake and tail thrash, single action is the only way to go.

We KNOW you're stronger than a salmon...with a single action reel you get to prove that you're also smarter than a salmon.
 
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