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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I copied and pasted this story directly off the Castanet website.


Photo: Contributed
On the evening of March 12, a Canada Customs official notified the BC Conservation Officer service that they found what looked like zebra and/or quagga mussels on a large pleasure-craft boat being transported from the U.S., across the Osoyoos border.
The Canadian Border Services Agency currently has no legislative authority to refuse entry, however, the commercial transporter was cooperative.
With only three conservation officers based in Penticton, CSBA called the province's toll-free emergency response (RAPP) line.
Conservation officers were able to bring in a decontamination unit to decontaminate the vessel the following day.
The boat, which originated from Texas, was headed to the Central Okanagan to be moored in Okanagan Lake.
The Okanagan Basin Water Board has been urging the federal government to pass legislation, that is pending, that will allow border guards to stop and inspect watercraft and prohibit entry of contaminated vessels.

and a little later on the same site:



Photo: Contributed - Wikipedia
Zebra mussels
Members of the Okanagan Basin Water Board are calling it a very close call. They are concerned with the news that a boat, covered with invasive mussels, was stopped at the Osoyoos border crossing.
"I think that we dodged a bullet. I think the people who are at the border crossing and conservation officers did a really excellent job of responding to the situation," says Anna Warwick Sears, executive director for the OBWB.
"The guy who was transporting the boat was cooperative, but it points to the fact that we need to get better prepared and that these boats are going to be coming to the Okanagan and we need to figure out how to anticipate that."
The vessel in question was being commercially transported from Texas, with Okanagan Lake as the stated destination. Border officials do not currently have the authority to prohibit boats containing invasive species from entering the country, but some regulations are currently under review in Ottawa that would change that.
Sears says there are a couple of ways to stop the spread of quagga and zebra mussels, but the first line of defence should be the border. Some people have spoken out for specialized inspection stations along the highways, but the border just makes more sense.
"You've already got the border there, you have a guard stopping cars and you have places for people to move over. It's cheaper to do it that way," she says.
"It really has to be a partnership between border services and the provincial government. The province does have a law in place that says it's illegal to introduce invasive aquatic species to the lakes and rivers of the Okanagan.
"So you can get a very large fine if you have a live zebra mussel in your boat and you put it in the water, but they also have the power to order a decontamination - which includes a very hot pressure washing."
That is what was done in this most recent case from March 12, using a portable decontamination unit brought in the following day.
Sears hopes this latest incident will help spread awareness that the problem of invasive species which cause irreparable damage is everyone's responsibility.
"We'd like the public to be engaged and know what the issues are, because it can't just be the government or the border guards who are involved with this. We all want to have the lake to be maintained in its beautiful condition and we all have to take some responsibility."
 

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I copied and pasted this story directly off the Castanet website.


Photo: Contributed
On the evening of March 12, a Canada Customs official notified the BC Conservation Officer service that they found what looked like zebra and/or quagga mussels on a large pleasure-craft boat being transported from the U.S., across the Osoyoos border.
The Canadian Border Services Agency currently has no legislative authority to refuse entry, however, the commercial transporter was cooperative.
With only three conservation officers based in Penticton, CSBA called the province's toll-free emergency response (RAPP) line.
Conservation officers were able to bring in a decontamination unit to decontaminate the vessel the following day.
The boat, which originated from Texas, was headed to the Central Okanagan to be moored in Okanagan Lake.
The Okanagan Basin Water Board has been urging the federal government to pass legislation, that is pending, that will allow border guards to stop and inspect watercraft and prohibit entry of contaminated vessels.

and a little later on the same site:



Photo: Contributed - Wikipedia
Zebra mussels
Members of the Okanagan Basin Water Board are calling it a very close call. They are concerned with the news that a boat, covered with invasive mussels, was stopped at the Osoyoos border crossing.
"I think that we dodged a bullet. I think the people who are at the border crossing and conservation officers did a really excellent job of responding to the situation," says Anna Warwick Sears, executive director for the OBWB.
"The guy who was transporting the boat was cooperative, but it points to the fact that we need to get better prepared and that these boats are going to be coming to the Okanagan and we need to figure out how to anticipate that."
The vessel in question was being commercially transported from Texas, with Okanagan Lake as the stated destination. Border officials do not currently have the authority to prohibit boats containing invasive species from entering the country, but some regulations are currently under review in Ottawa that would change that.
Sears says there are a couple of ways to stop the spread of quagga and zebra mussels, but the first line of defence should be the border. Some people have spoken out for specialized inspection stations along the highways, but the border just makes more sense.
"You've already got the border there, you have a guard stopping cars and you have places for people to move over. It's cheaper to do it that way," she says.
"It really has to be a partnership between border services and the provincial government. The province does have a law in place that says it's illegal to introduce invasive aquatic species to the lakes and rivers of the Okanagan.
"So you can get a very large fine if you have a live zebra mussel in your boat and you put it in the water, but they also have the power to order a decontamination - which includes a very hot pressure washing."
That is what was done in this most recent case from March 12, using a portable decontamination unit brought in the following day.
Sears hopes this latest incident will help spread awareness that the problem of invasive species which cause irreparable damage is everyone's responsibility.
"We'd like the public to be engaged and know what the issues are, because it can't just be the government or the border guards who are involved with this. We all want to have the lake to be maintained in its beautiful condition and we all have to take some responsibility."
Great post Clint.
The Engineering company I work for researched, with federal grants, the entire dilemma, and now manufactures the wash and filtration systems bought by the US Government (and now that the systems are proven, to private marinas) for sanitizing boats and towing vehicles.

We do all kinds of De-Con for various invasive species, (including the 'club root' that your Agricultural Department doesn't want spread along agricultural areas adjacent to pipelines) and the Quagga is one of the most pervasive.

We started at Lake Powell, and like wildfire spreading out, now have systems going all over North America.

The Quagga initially got to the Great Lakes in bilges of freighters coming from the Black and Caspian seas, and is now hitchhiking all over the place on boats, trailers and anywhere water collects in a boat.

The mussels themselves as well as their eggs, or veliger, can survive long periods out of water.
A boat that sits out for the winter might well still be carrying Quagga capable of reproducing.

It's a menace for any number of reasons, and vigilance in preventing it's continued spread is becoming a huge focus.
Preventative maintenance will be the key...once it's in a body of water, you're losing that battle.

Our international division is already working with your Government, and they are smart to get on top of this, and with haste.

There is already fear of it's spreading north from the Great Lakes. They didn't really catch on to what it is until they were established and becoming problematic.

I wish Canada well in doing their diligence to help curb the spread.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Interesting. Do you know if they can survive any length of time in the saltwater? Say if someone bought a used boat used in both fresh and salt water and motored it up from Washington to be used here in both types of water? We've been seeing/hearing alot of TV/radio commercials about these mussels but never a mention of salt water. Clearly, somebody is worried about them though.
 

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Interesting. Do you know if they can survive any length of time in the saltwater? Say if someone bought a used boat used in both fresh and salt water and motored it up from Washington to be used here in both types of water? We've been seeing/hearing alot of TV/radio commercials about these mussels but never a mention of salt water. Clearly, somebody is worried about them though.
Salt water...don 't know. They came from brackish water in Eastern Europe. I'm no marine biologist (cue up George Costanza) I imagine it might kill them. But that's just a guess.

They got into Lake Powell some years back. An attorney bought a houseboat from the Great Lakes area. Rangers saw the Quagga clustered on the underside, and asked him not to launch. The lawyer said without a legal reason, for them to boff themselves, and in she went. Back then, nobody knew how large a problem it would become.

Now the fear is that they will get into the Hydroelectric workings of the Hoover Dam.

In and of themselves, they pose little threat. They are not poisonous.
But they grow in huge clusters.....picture a large, mutant, sharp-edged bunch of grapes.

They clog pipes, drains etc.

Lake Las Vegas is a pricey gated area, and the entirety of their heat exchangers for the whole community used for cooling got clogged, costing millions in repairs. Their sharp shells litter beaches, and can cut the hell out of you.

In areas like parts of Colorado, Utah, Arizona--many of the reservoirs are connected by conduits and pipes---and these are getting clogged.
Not only by the swarms of Quagga clusters, but by all the crap they snag.

In a dry environment, they can live a year or longer. The ONLY accepted method for decontaminating boats, trailers and tow vehicles is to directly hit the Quagga with 140 dec C water.

Another issue is that ski and wakeboard boats have bladders to take water in for ballast and influencing wake size.

If these are not purged and treated with hot water, they make perfect "mules" for carrying the Quagga and veliger.

It's a menace, and boat owners need to be responsible and governments vigilant.

At Clear Lake in No. Cal, they didn't have money for Decon at the 100+ put ins. However, they could afford 4 stations for the only 4 road routs into the lake.

Yeah....education is key here. Quagga can't transport themselves...and people have to know and understand the problem and solutions.
Guys don't want to wait the extra hour leaving the lake for decon, so they take a back road or dirt road out. They are huge contributors to the spread.

You can't eradicate them once they are in a body of water, and...short of poisoning the entire body of water, there is little you can do.

These efforts are just to stop the spread, not to control Quagga populations already in residence.

Edit...
HAHAHA Below this thread is a link to Mussels steamed in Wheat Beer and Orange Maybe THAT will kill the little bastards...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here's an update on the Zebra mussel situation in Manitoba. Not BC I know but makes for interesting reading regardless. And hopefully someone in our govt is paying attention.

Legislation to stop mussels
The Canadian Press - Dec 3 12:30 pm
Photo: Contributed - Wikimedia
First, Manitoba tried killing them with potash.
Now the province will try to curb the spread of zebra mussels through legislation with strict rules for boaters.
Conservation Minister Gord Mackintosh has introduced a bill that would make it illegal to transport, possess or release zebra mussels, and would require boats in transit to be inspected at designated stations.
The province declared victory over zebra mussels in June after a unique experiment which doused four infested harbours with liquid potash.
The harbours were initially declared mussel free, but they were discovered in Lake Winnipeg later in the summer.
The invasive species, which has been in the Great Lakes for almost two decades and has spread throughout parts of the United States, was discovered for the first time in Manitoba in October 2013.
The mussels reproduce quickly and can disrupt the food chain, clog water pipes and create algae.
The government has been criticized by both the Liberals and the Opposition Tories for not acting fast enough to stop the spread.
The legislature rises Thursday, so there'e no chance for the bill to be passed until next year.
The proposed legislation is modelled on law in Minnesota.
 
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